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Klaus Schoneich Clinics - 2017

posted Jul 29, 2016, 9:08 PM by The Administrator   [ updated Mar 26, 2017, 8:59 PM ]

2017 'Straightening the Crooked Horse' Clinics 
with Klaus Schoneich

Clinic 1:  Sept 28th -  Oct 1st, 2017
Pacific Equestrian Center, Wilton, CA
contact:  

Clinic 2:  Oct 3rd - 6th, 2017
Campana Ranch Training Stables
Windsor, CA
contact:  sher@campanaranch.net

Clinic 3:  Oct 8th - 11th, 2017 
Diamond Bar Arena, Ceres, CA
contact:  kimlisle@hotmail.com

Klaus wrote the book "Straightening the Crooked Horse." He focuses on helping horses straighten themselves naturally. A very patient horseman, Klaus initially trains the horse on the lunge - with only a cavesson. He then teaches the owner how to continue the work on the lunge and under saddle (if the horse progresses enough). Everyone who has participated in these clinics has found that their horses change significantly for the better.


Visit his web site at: www.arr.de (click on English link).


More about Klaus' work:

The way to your horse

Only rarely does one see a horse with his back truly swinging upward. Words cannot describe the feeling of riding such a horse. This method will enable your horse to build strong, upward-swinging backs. Only then will your horse lead a long and healthy life as a ridden horse; only then can he receive and process the rider's impulses. This training is suited for horses of all ages, breeds and levels of training. 

Inherent Crookedness

A horse carries his main body weight (app. 60 percent) on his forelegs, because most of his vital organs sit in the front part of the body. 

A horse is inherently crooked. He can only bend his spine to one side – his ‘handed’ side. The horse’s handedness is similar to that of human beings: they are either right- or left-handed. When stumbling, a man will make a step to regain his balance, and he will use his handed foot to do so, or he will use his handed hand to support himself when falling down. The same pattern can be observed in horses on a circle: the horse will try to support his balance by putting his main weight to his handed foreleg.

In the wild, crookedness and weight on the forehand does not pose a problem for the horse. However, when a rider’s weight is brought upon the horse’s back, his crookedness starts to seriously affect his health.

Straightness Training

Straightness training is based on the theories of old scholars, but has been adapted to meet the requirements and challenges of modern breeding and riding. This training consists of two steps. First, the horse is straightened with a cavesson on the longe, and his trunk musculature is built to a point where he will be able to carry a rider’s weight. Second, this training is sustained under saddle. The horse, now balanced and strong, will meet this challenge calmly.

Both young horses (whose training is just beginning) and adult horses that need correction (because they have never been straightened or have relapsed into old movement patterns) are treated and trained this way.

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